OpenDremel update and Dremel vs. Tenzing

I wasn’t blogged for whole 2011 year… I’m not dead, quite on contrary, we were pretty active with OpenDremel project in 2011. First, we are renaming it to Dazo to avoid using a trademarked name and second, we did a good job implementing a secure generic execution engine and integrating it into OpenStack Swift. It also came out, that the engine is actually quite useful virtualization technology in itself and it could potentially deserve a better fate than being buried as OpenDremel subcomponent. So, we do plan to release it as independent project and are quite busy with that now, so the work on OpenDremel is all but stalled unfortunately. As for storage infrastructure we settled with OpenStack Swift, we falled in love with Swift from the day it was released and now after we have integrated ZeroVM into it we even like it even more. So right now, we have fully salable storage backend with the unique capability to run securely any arbitrary native code inside, close to data. Now, what’s left is to take our old Metaxa Query Compiler and integrate it with that backend and then after many iterations it would bake into something pretty similar to Google Dremel and BigQuery. Even better, it will always process data locally (not sure BigQuery does it now) and it will not be limited to BQL on nested records, but for any query on any data and with full multi-tenant semantics. That’s how interesting 2011 was…

It was a preamble now back to the main feature:

Google released a paper on Tenzing last year on VLDB. Tenzing is an SQL query-system implemented on top of MapReduce infrastructure and it can be thought as Google-way to do Hive and as always full of juicy details. There is already a quality post on this published and another one here. On top of that my additional takeways are:

1. It is possible to build MPP-grade system on top of MapReduce with relatively low-latency (10 seconds). However, it would requires quite a number of patches to MapReduce. Hive and Hadoop has certainly a lot to learn from Tenzing.

2. Even with Google version of a patched and leaner-than-Hadoop implementation of MapReduce getting it to Dremel latencies was not achievable. On other hand 10 seconds as minimal latency is not that bad and in same ball park as Netezza/Greenplum/Aster and other MPP gear.

3. As general Sawzall vs. Dremel vs. Tenzing comparison there is an nice youtube-datawarehousing presentation published. In fact, Dremel beats both of them on latency and if not only for limited expressive power of its query language it would end up as complete winner on all metrics considered there. Sawzall having imperative query language scores highest on the power metric. I guess when OpenDremel will be released it will be a unique combination of low-latency querying with the full expressive power of imperatively-augmented SQL.

4. Tenzing can query MySQL databases as many other popular data formats. What we witnessing here is that query-engines is being decoupled from storage engines. 10 years ago it was only the case for MySQL ecosystem and anyone who tried Oracle external table interface knows how friendly past DBMSes were to external data sources.  Dremel columnar encoding component was released internally in Google as separate ColumnIO storage engine. Then Google open-sourced their key-value LevelDB engine a-la Hadoop’s RCFiles. So we can learn here of emergence of multiple storage-engines working with multiple query engines, quite interesting phenomenon.

5. The query is compiled into native code (with LLVM) and this gave significant acceleration by factor from six to twelve. This means that SQL to native code compilation is a must for high-performance BigData query engines.

 

Google Percolator: MapReduce Demise?

Here is my early thoughts after quickly looking into  Google Percolator and skimming the paper .

Major take-away: massive transactional mutating of tens-petabyte-scale dataset on thousands-node cluster is possible!

MapReduce is still useful for distributed sorts of big-data and few other things, nevertheless it’s “karma” has suffered a blow. Beforehand you could end any MapReduce dispute by saying “well… it works for Google”, however, nowadays before you say it you would hear “well…. it didn’t work for Google”. MapReduce is particularly criticized by having 1) too long latency, 2)too wasteful, requiring full rework of the whole tens-of-PB-scale dataset even if only a fraction of it had been changed and 3) inability to support kinda-real-time data processing (meaning processing documents as they are crawled and updating index appropriately). In short: welcome to disillusionment stage of MapReduce saga. And luckily Hadoop is not only MapReduce, I’m convinced Hadoop will thrive and flourish beyond MapReduce and MapReduce being an important big data tool will be widely used where it really makes sense rather than misused or abused in various ways. Aster Data and remaining MPP startups can relax on the issue a bit.

Probably a topic for another post, but I think MapReduce is best leveraged as ETL tool.

See also http://blog.tonybain.com/tony_bain/2010/09/was-stonebraker-right.html for another view on the issue. There are few others posts already published  on Precolator but I haven’t yet looked into them.

I’m very happy about my SVLC-hypothesis, I think I knew it for a long time, but somehow only now, after I have put it on paper, I felt that the reasoning about different analytics approaches became easier. It is like having a map instead of visualizing it. So where is Percolator in the context of SVLC? If it is still considered analytics, Percolator is an SVC system – giving up latency for everything else, albeit to a lot lesser degree than its successor MapReduce. That said Percolator has a sizable part that is not analytics anymore but rather transaction processing. And transaction processing  is not usefully modeled by my SVLC-hypothesis. In summary: Percolator is essentially the trade-off as MapReduce – sacrificing latency for volume-cost-sophistication but more temperate, more rounded,  less-radical.

Unfortunately I haven’t enough time to enjoy the paper as it should be enjoyed with easy weekend-style reading. So inaccuracies may have been infiltrated in:

  • Percolator is big-data ACID-compliant transaction-processing non-relational DBMS.
  • Percolator fits most NoSQL definitions and therefore it is a NoSQL.
  • Percolator  continuously mutates dataset (called data corpus in the paper) with full transactional semantics and in the sizes of tens of petabytes on thousands of nodes.
  • Percolator uses a message-queue style approach for processing crawled data. Meaning, it processes the crawled pages continuously as they arrive updating the index database transactionaly.
  • BEFORE Percolator: Indexing was done in stages taking weeks. All crawled data was accumulated and staged first, then pass-after-pass transformed into index. 100-passes were quoted in the paper as I remember. When the cycle was completed a new one was initiated. Few weeks latency after content was published and before it appeared in Google search results were considered too long in twitter age, so Google implemented some shortcuts allowing preliminary results to show in search before the cycle is completed.
  • Percolator  doesn’t have declarative query language.
  • No joins.
  • Self-stated ~3% single node efficiency relative to the state-of-the-art DBMS system on single node. That’s the price for handling (which is transactional mutating) high-volume dataset… and relatively cheaply. Kudos for Google to being so open on this and not exercising in term-obfuscation. On the other hand, they can afford it… they don’t have to sell it tomorrow on rather competitive NoSQL market ;)
  • Thread-per-transaction model. Heavily threaded many-core servers as I understand.

Architecturally reminds me MoM (Message Oriented Middleware) with transactional queues and guarantied delivery.

Definitely to be continued…

other Percolator blog posts:

http://www.infoq.com/news/2010/10/google-percolator
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/09/24/google_percolator
http://coolthingoftheday.blogspot.com/2010/10/percolator-question-is-how-does-google.html
http://www.quora.com/What-is-Google-Percolator